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Leggari Dirty Pour Technique Done On A Wooden Surface

Welcome to another Learning Center article #LeggariNation! This article will show you one of the many techniques that can be used, using our Leggari stone kits.

The products used are our midnight pearl stone kit and white spray paint.

Many people think that it is not possible to do a dirty pour technique on countertops because most dirty pours are tilting, and countertops cannot be tilted.

We have come up with a successful way for this to be possible. We will show you how this is not only possible but very simple to do.

Step 1: Primer

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The first thing you want to do is to prime your board. In this case, because we are coating over wood, we want to make sure to get a nice even layer throughout the entire board of primer.

This is done with a paint roller. simply get an even layer on your whole board.

Pro Tip: Before applying the primer with the paint roller, we suggest you take some inverted masking tape around your hand and run it across the surface to remove any loose fibers, otherwise those loose fibers may come off onto the board and ruin your hard work. 

Step 2: Taping Edges

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The next step is key to doing a dirty pour technique over countertops. It is vital that all edges are taped off completely.

This allows you to add extra epoxy, the epoxy will spread on its own on the board or countertop, and that is what gives you that natural stone look.

Step 3: Applying Basecoat

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The next step is easy but important to get right. You want to apply your base coat, but need to ensure it is just an even thin layer throughout the board, this is to facilitate the dirty pour to level out.

You want to apply your base coat, but need to ensure it is just an even thin layer throughout the board, this is to facilitate the dirty pour to level out.

In the image above you can see Tylor spreads it with a squeegee, it can also be done with a paint stick or anything you may have to spread it evenly. Above you can see how Tylor pours it right down the middle, then begins to spread it across the entire board. You want to add about 2oz per square foot.

Pro tip: When spreading, try not to press any of the base coat up against the tape too much, remember, that seal that the tape has created is what will ensure this technique is a success. If using a squeegee, spread the basecoat at a low angle so that is still leaving some product behind.  

StepStep 4: Getting epoxy ready

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Now that your board is ready to be coated, you are going to want to pour about 9oz per square foot onto the board.

As seen above, there are multiple cups that Tylor is pouring the epoxy into. This creates new and random pours as he coats the board.

As seen above, there are multiple cups that Tylor is pouring the epoxy into. This creates new and random pours as he coats the board.

Pro tip: You don’t want to mix the spray paint too much inside the epoxy cup, just enough for it to not be sitting on top of the epoxy. 

Step 5: Pouring Epoxy

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You are now ready to start your dirty pour! To give a reference, we take a stir stick to trace his pour on the prepped board, this is just a completely random design, but he likes to have some sort of path to follow as he pours.

Once you start pouring, if you want to add more spray paint into your epoxy cup, go ahead! Remember it is up to your personal preference.

Step 6: Finalizing Board

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Using Isopropyl alcohol (91% or higher) creates the dispersing effects. This enhances your project’s look so much we highly recommend using this. You can do it by just spraying it lightly onto the board after your pour is done.

If you want to create small veins, take your epoxy cup and bend it/ squeeze it in half, this will slow down the pour as you go and it will allow you to get smaller-looking veins throughout your board.

Step 7: Peeling Off the Tape

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Depending on the temperature that your project is in, you might want to wait about 2 hours before peeling off the tape on the sides.

This permits the design to stay in place before removing it. If you remove it too early the design that you have created can expand and move more than you want it to.

Notice in the picture above, there is no product running off the board, therefore the design won’t be altered by it running off and stretching the design. If you do have a little bit of product running off the edges, as long as it is not too much you will be fine.

Final look:

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After successfully pulling off the tape, you should have a beautiful design on your surface.

Scott Crider